Paul Skizinski

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  • in reply to: Ask Away: Questions on Mental Health for our Next Governor #29257

    Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    Good thoughts, Dotty. Having never experienced that problem myself, it didn’t come to mind when I made my comments, but I have heard in the news about the issue, and it deserves attention from our lawmakers, as well as those in charge of police departments.

  • in reply to: Ask Away: Questions on Mental Health for our Next Governor #29253

    Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    Oh, and yes, I am concerned about the way some law enforcement officers relate to persons with mental illness. I might add that those who act with brutal force get all the news, which is unfair to the majority of police who treat everyone appropriately.

  • in reply to: Ask Away: Questions on Mental Health for our Next Governor #29252

    Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    Good morning, JR. I assume you have directed your post to me, since I’m the only other person to have submitted a post. I buy a sandwich at Subway at least once a month. They are consistently good, healthy and good value. I would be happy to meet you. I live in Englewood, and besides Subway I frequent any of several Old Chicago locations. The one at RiverPoint is close to home. I could not tell you without searching online what DSM-V means. I’m certainly no expert on mental health issues, so if I were meeting and visiting a person with a mental health condition, I would not boldly embark on advice which might be misguided, but would more likely let that person lead the conversation. I would listen with compassion. I’d also look for common ground on subjects not related to mental health. If you wish to contact me, you can find me on Facebook under my first and last name.

  • in reply to: Ask Away: Questions on Mental Health for our Next Governor #29250

    Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    I see a couple of issues on this subject. One is that it is important that mental health be covered by insurance, just as physical ailments are. This seems like it is primarily a concern of insurance companies, but perhaps there can be some effort from government to encourage insurance companies to cover it to the same degree as all other health concerns. And secondly, we need a coordinated effort on the part of government, along with non-governmental organizations, providers and the media to remove the stigma of mental illness as something of which we should be ashamed. We are gradually realizing how prevalent mental illness is in our society, but we still don’t accept it as just another ailment. In the past, I have suffered from depression, and with help I overcame it. Currently my wife is in counseling and on medication to help her gain a better feeling of self-worth. Many other people probably could benefit from similar treatment, but are reluctant to get it because they don’t want to be thought of as having a mental problem. Let’s try to fix that!


  • Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    Thanks for your comment, Kmwhit39. Most of us, whether handicapped or not, want to do and say the right things, but sometimes we say the wrong thing without meaning any harm. I think the answer is education, and that will be achieved only if persons with any kind of handicap make it known to everyone else how they would like to be addressed. Even that is a less than perfect solution, as there are so many different kinds of disabilities, and so many things that could be said that someone may find offensive. But if we listen and learn, we will minimize the problem, even if we don’t solve it completely.


  • Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    I can’t say that I disagree with you, sdahl, but it seems to me to be a rather fine point and a matter of semantics. I meant no harm with my wording, which I think is far less offensive that what comes out of the White House every day. Tip-toeing around certain words can be a minefield of its own. I am reminded of a young woman whose wedding I sang at, in which she married the twin brother of my friend. She is blind, and he had other disabilities, and they decided to share their lives and support one another. Some time after the wedding, I visited them at their apartment, and used what I thought were appropriate and compassionate words, but she took offense. It left me unsure how to converse with her, because she had her own ideas about how she wanted to be addressed. Every person with any kind of disability has a particular idea of what people should or should not say to them.


  • Paul Skizinski
    Participant

    I can see that you are making two major points here. First you criticize the current occupant of the White House for his incessant use of name-calling, especially when he makes negative use of words suggesting mental illness by applying them to people who are most likely not mentally ill. Then you comment on the proliferation of such disparaging words by the general public. I agree wholeheartedly with both points, but I want to go on to say that the two are closely related and the second has grown noticeably worse since “Agent Orange” came into political prominence, even before the election. His use of words that cast such a shadow on mental health as a condition has seemingly legitimized such terms among his followers for the wrong purpose. At the same time, he clearly demonstrates that he himself is mentally ill, making him unfit for the presidency.

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